Adductor longus - Musculus adductor longus

Description

Origin: Pubic body just below the pubic crest

Insertion: Middle third of linea aspera

Artery: Obturator artery

Nerve: Anterior branch of obturator nerve

Action: Adduction of thigh

Description:
The Adductor longus, the most superficial of the three Adductores, is a triangular muscle, lying in the same plane as the Pectineus. It arises by a flat, narrow tendon, from the front of the pubis, at the angle of junction of the crest with the symphysis; and soon expands into a broad fleshy belly. This passes downward, backward, and lateralward, and is inserted, by an aponeurosis, into the linea aspera, between the Vastus medialis and the Adductor magnus, with both of which it is usually blended.


This definition incorporates text from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy (20th U.S. edition of Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body, published in 1918 – from http://www.bartleby.com/107/).

Translations