Trabeculae carneae - Trabeculae carneae

Anatomical hierarchy

General Anatomy > Cardiovascular system > Heart > Left ventricle > Trabeculae carneae

Translations

Description

The trabeculæ carneæ are rounded or irregular muscular columns which project from the whole of the inner surface of the ventricle.

 

Theyr are of three kinds, like those upon the right side, but they are more numerous, and present a dense interlacement, especially at the apex, and upon the posterior wall of the ventricle: some are attached along their entire length on one side and merely form prominent ridges, others are fixed at their extremities but free in the middle, while a third set (musculi papillares) are continuous by their bases with the wall of the ventricle, while their apices give origin to the chordæ tendineæ which pass to be attached to the segments of the mitral valve.


This definition incorporates text from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy (20th U.S. edition of Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body, published in 1918 – from http://www.bartleby.com/107/).

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